PERMANENT

downtown

art in architecture, Müllerstr. 11, Innsbruck, 2015

two photographic murals: photo print on glass, 2,5 x 17,6 m and 12 x 3,7 m

in collaboration with Thomas Huber (GÆG)

Architects Volker Flamm, Wolfgang Ohnmacht

Out of the contextually urban quality of the site and the cool, so far non-chromatic appearance of the architecture, an existing work of Thomas Huber (downtown huabacity) was chosen to be model for extreme macro photographs.

The angle of view in the longish piece in the entrance hall of the building refers to the unique aspect of the city of Innsbruck: the high mountains here are incomparable close to an urban city center, which allows the citizen to think about a ‘normal’ view from diagonal above and not of an artificial ‘bird’s eye view’.

Out of the same original, one tower building was selected as an appropriate detail to become the motive for the 5-storey mural in the staircase – another step in scale. The model detail is enlarged here in factor 620!  

nasenspiegel

art in architecture for police station in Allach, sleuth dog unit, 2015,

photo print/ glass, 250 x 190 cm

in collaboration with the photographer Henning Koepke, Architect Michael Bosch,

Staatliches Bauamt München 1

innside

art in architecture, Hypo Tirol Innsbruck, branch Innrain,

1st prize nominated competition, 2008

subsoil water photo print on glass, subsoil water live broadcast

in collaboration with Thomas Huber (GÆG), Architects Brunner & Sallmann

On 20 glass panels a section-photograph of an Inn-wave is printed, which ascending to the right, antagonizes the architectural topology.

 

In collaboration with the Hydrographic Institute Tirol a subsoil water-camera was developed for this unique use in a wild and milky alpine river and installed in the river Inn.

It broadcasts through the internet to a monitor in the building. Later it was shown in a window of the gauge computing centre next to the river.

Although the underwater scenery is lit by a LED, the cloudy water mainly allows very atmospheric, abstract pictures.

 

The concept-phase took place before the bank-crisis 2008. In this light the work requires a certain precognitive quality - by the end of 2008, the financial service providers “were in deep water“.

 

www.gaeg.net/innside.html

werteaustausch

art in the architecture, Hypo Tirol Innsbruck, branch Triumphpforte, 2006 

photo print on glass, light;

in collaboration with Thomas Huber (GÆG), Architects Ohnmacht & Flamm

Three works of art, dealing with the theme of exchange of values, expend from the basement to the first floor:
The gate of the vault space in the basement is staged like a ‘treasure chamber’s gate’. The panels of glass show macros of security features, each superimposed in two layers: the texture of a fingerprint and of a banknote, backlit by LED. The Installation is modeled on the UV- checking device for banknotes.

On ground floor ranges over 25 meters a macroscopic print on glass revealing the edge of a 1 euro coin, appearing in its enlargement in the factor of 1500 rather archaically imprecise, as the embossed metal has abrasions, patina and the impureness of coinage.

58 meters of glass dividing walls in the first floor are printed with a digital abstraction of money. Source codes of charts of exchange rates in the worldwide web were chosen in accordant languages and fonts. The delineation consists of the quotations of the euro to the currencies of USA, Japan, UK, Russia, China, India and Saudi-Arabia within the period of the last 5 years.

 

www.gaeg.net/werte.html

monitor

art in architecture for Volksbank Ischgl, Tyrol, 2004, acrylic/ steel mesh,

633 x 385 cm

Architects Architekturhalle, Telfs

eklipse

art in architecture for kindergarten in Eglfing, 2002

relief in concrete wall, metal disc, stained glass, acrylic/ steel mesh,

light, concrete slabs

in collaboration with Martin Aichner, Architect 

autobahnbild

art in architecture for the motorway police station in Hohenbrunn, 1997

1st prize nominated competition Staatliches Bauamt München 1

acrylic/ steel mesh, 330 x 690 cm, light, concrete slabs

in collaboration with Martin Aichner, Architect Andreas Muschialik

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